Through the heart: pay heart as an embodiment of sincerity

Through the heart: pay heart as an embodiment of sincerity

Usually, ethical judgment had been called an ongoing process involving aware idea and which greatly relied on language and semantic thinking (Kohlberg 1973). Our studies develop regarding the social intuitionist model (Haidt 2001), which assumes that ethical judgment involves instant intuitions, that are automated and amenable to contextual cues that may alter ethical judgment without intention or understanding (cf. Schnall et al. 2008a, b). But, current studies additionally increase the social intuitionist model, which presumes that ethical intuitions are often affective in the wild and necessarily include alterations in the affective states associated with ethical “judge. ” We revealed that the hand-over-heart gesture can alter ethical judgment without affecting psychological states (at mood that is least), due to the simple relationship involving the motion and particular ethical principles (as evidenced by Parzuchowski and Wojciszke 2014). This suggests that moral intuitions are not necessarily affective in nature—rather they are based on associative architecture which is typical for the automatic/impulsive processes (including affective responses), as opposed to controlled/reflective processes that are based on propositions (Strack and Deutsch 2004) and underlie deliberative moral reasoning in our reading. 继续阅读“Through the heart: pay heart as an embodiment of sincerity”